I Celebrate My Best Man, Dr Phyl Ozuah

  • TONY RAPU

Not a few people have asked me if I really know Dr Phyl Ozuah. Yes, I do.

Indeed, we attended medical school together at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria from 1980 to 1985. When we graduated, I went to do my Housemanship at LUTH, while Phyl did his outside Lagos. A few years later, he traveled abroad to begin a distinguished career in Medicine.

After a Master’s Degree in Education in Los Angeles, and a postgraduate degree in Educational Leadership and Administration in Nebraska, he started his Paediatric Internship and Residency at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Montefiore. His Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Medical Education was at the University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles.

Dr Phyl quickly rose to become the President and CEO of Montefiore Medicine, the umbrella organization for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Today, he leads about 10,000 physicians and 53,000 employees serving a diverse group of patients.

Back when we were in medical school, Dr Phyl and I studied and prepared for exams together, laughed together and played together. He happens to be a Karate Master and Black Belt holder and taught me a bit of karate in our preclinical years, when we had a little more time outside of studies. I’ve never seen a sharper mind or keener intellect than Dr Phyl’s nor a more generous person.

There was never a dull moment with Phyl with his great sense of humour. He would turn everything into a joke and we would often sit and laugh heartily over everything. We did ward rounds together and I remember us travelling to our outside rural posting at Igbo-Ora in Oyo state.

Dr Phyl was best man at my wedding in 1987. I visited him in Enugu at the time and remember we went shopping together for our wedding suits a week before the wedding. He was the coolest and most accommodating best man.

In 2010, we both joined our former classmates at Center Parcs Conference Centre in the UK where we gathered to celebrate 25 years since graduation, grateful for the excellent foundation we received in UCH. It was a meeting of brilliant academics, professors and consultants of various disciplines in medicine, with many now scattered across the globe making a strong impact in their own spheres. I’m grateful for the solid foundation we had in Ibadan.

When I visited Phyl in New York at the Albert Einstein University in 2015, we sat in his office and compared notes on what we were both doing. He spoke about his desire to give back to Nigeria; and has since then been doing quite a bit behind the scenes supporting many worthy causes and initiatives.

I truly celebrate a great man and loyal friend in the person of Dr Phyl; it gives me hope for a better Nigeria where geniuses like him who have excelled will like Nehemiah, join hands to build the Nation of our dreams.

Dr Phyl Ozuah

Not a few people have asked me if I really know Dr Phyl Ozuah. Yes, I do.

Indeed, we attended medical school together at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria from 1980 to 1985. When we graduated, I went to do my Housemanship at LUTH, while Phyl did his outside Lagos. A few years later, he traveled abroad to begin a distinguished career in Medicine.

After a Master’s Degree in Education in Los Angeles, and a postgraduate degree in Educational Leadership and Administration in Nebraska, he started his Paediatric Internship and Residency at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Montefiore. His Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Medical Education was at the University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles.

Dr Phyl quickly rose to become the President and CEO of Montefiore Medicine, the umbrella organization for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Today, he leads about 10,000 physicians and 53,000 employees serving a diverse group of patients.

Back when we were in medical school, Dr Phyl and I studied and prepared for exams together, laughed together and played together. He happens to be a Karate Master and Black Belt holder and taught me a bit of karate in our preclinical years, when we had a little more time outside of studies. I’ve never seen a sharper mind or keener intellect than Dr Phyl’s nor a more generous person.

There was never a dull moment with Phyl with his great sense of humour. He would turn everything into a joke and we would often sit and laugh heartily over everything. We did ward rounds together and I remember us travelling to our outside rural posting at Igbo-Ora in Oyo state.

Dr Phyl was best man at my wedding in 1987. I visited him in Enugu at the time and remember we went shopping together for our wedding suits a week before the wedding. He was the coolest and most accommodating best man.

In 2010, we both joined our former classmates at Center Parcs Conference Centre in the UK where we gathered to celebrate 25 years since graduation, grateful for the excellent foundation we received in UCH. It was a meeting of brilliant academics, professors and consultants of various disciplines in medicine, with many now scattered across the globe making a strong impact in their own spheres. I’m grateful for the solid foundation we had in Ibadan.

When I visited Phyl in New York at the Albert Einstein University in 2015, we sat in his office and compared notes on what we were both doing. He spoke about his desire to give back to Nigeria; and has since then been doing quite a bit behind the scenes supporting many worthy causes and initiatives.

I truly celebrate a great man and loyal friend in the person of Dr Phyl; it gives me hope for a better Nigeria where geniuses like him who have excelled will like Nehemiah, join hands to build the Nation of our dreams.

Tobi Amusan Sets New Record, Wins Commonwealth Gold

Nigeria’s Tobi Amusan has won the gold medal in the women’s 100m hurdles at the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, United Kingdom.

The world champion successfully defended her title at the Alexander Stadium on Sunday in the women’s 100m hurdles final.

Amusan was able to run a Games record of 12.30s, setting other records as well, and becoming the first world champion to win gold and the first Nigerian athlete to do the same.

Amusan was one of the favourites to get the gold at the tournament following her impressive showing at the World Athletics Championships in Oregon, the United States, which saw her break multiple records to win Nigeria’s first gold at the World Championships.

Having done it on another continent, Amusan made sure to replicate that fine display in Europe, proving that it was no fluke and that it was indeed her time.

The 25-year-old ran a blistering 12.30secs to claim the gold and also set a new Games Record in Birmingham.

“Honestly, I believe in my abilities but I was not expecting a world record at these championships.

“The goal is always just to execute well and get the win. So the world record is a bonus. I knew I had it in me but I could not believe it when I saw it on the screen after the semis.

“Before the final, I just tried to stay calm and to do my best. I took a deep breath knowing that I have some goals to accomplish and it worked pretty well. I knew it was very fast but not this fast,” Amusan said after her final victory.

Coming up behind here were Bahamas’s Devynne Charlton (12.58secs) who took silver and England’s Cindy Sember (12.59secs) who took bronze with both some notable distance behind the eventual winner.

With this result, Nigeria has now won 10 gold medals and 31 medals in total.

Team Nigeria are now just one behind the gold medal record set by the 1994 team (11 gold medals) at the Commonwealth Games and six behind the total medals record (37 medals).

With seven competitions still holding potential for gold for the team on the final day and World Athletics Championship silver medallist Ese Brume still in competition later today, Nigeria can and will hope for more.

Tinubu Salutes Daisy Danjuma at 70

All Progressives Congress Presidential Candidate, Asiwaju Bola Tinubu, has praised Senator Daisy Danjuma’s outstanding leadership and exemplary contributions to Nigeria and humanity as she clocks 70 today.
In a statement by his Media Office on Saturday in Abuja, the APC presidential standard bearer said: “It is with great pleasure and delight that I join her family, friends and the entire nation to celebrate Senator Daisy Danjuma, a true amazon and exemplary figure, on the occasion of her 70th birthday.

“Senator Danjuma is an outstanding leader and patriot whose contributions as the representative of Edo South Senatorial District in the National Assembly and as a role model to millions of women and girls across the country helped to offer relief and meaningful opportunities not just to her home constituents, but to scores of other underprivileged Nigerians.

“Her laudable success in politics and business, alongside her remarkable legal scholarship, has inspired many and continues to serve as a powerful example of what our nation stands to benefit when women are empowered and enabled to flourish.

“As she enjoys her milestone platinum jubilee, I pray that the Almighty grants her many more years in great health, happiness, and increased wisdom to continue in her spirited service to the nation.”

AfDB President Congratulates Daisy Danjuma at 70

The President of the African Development Bank, AfDB, has congratulated Mrs. Daisy Danjuma on her 70th birthday.

Adesina  in his verified Twitter handle, @akin_adesina,  described her as “beauty, brain, entrepreneurship , kindness, generosity, community and national service all wrapped into a gem of a personality.”

Adesina added “congratulations to you, Gen. Danjuma and the entire family on the milestone.

“May God grant you many more blessed years.”

Danjuma represented Edo South constituency of Edo State at the  National Assembly from 2003 to 2007.

As a senator she served as the Chairman, Senate Committee on Women Affairs and Youth Development, Member, Senate Committees on Health, Education, Finance and Land Transport of the National Assembly. Being a senator from Nigeria gave Danjuma the opportunity to be a member of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association (CPA).

 She has also served as Chairman, Women and Child Right Committee of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS Parliament).

Buhari Hails Daisy Danjuma at 70, Extols Her Years of Service to Nation, Humanity

+ Says her commitment to alleviating plight of women, children unparalleled

Lawyer, politician, businesswoman and philanthropist, Senator Daisy Ehanire Danjuma is 70 today and President Muhammadu Buhari was quick to send her warm greetings, praising Daisy’s many years of service to the nation and humanity.

In his congratulatory letter to Daisy, wife of former Chief of Army Staff, Lt. Gen. Theophilus Danjuma (rtd), personally signed by him, the President also saluted her commitment to a better living standard for the less privileged across Nigeria.

Buhari wrote: “On behalf of myself and my family, I wish to felicitate with you as you attain the auspicious age of 70. Distinguished Senator, I join your family members, friends and political associates in celebrating the auspicious moment with you, heralded by many years of service to the nation and humanity.“As an accomplished entrepreneur and philanthropist, I am particularly pleased by the commitment you have shown to the plight of the disadvantaged in the society especially women and children.

“I also note that your passion for this cause was further reinforced during your period in the National Assembly between 2003 and 2007 where you served as the Chairperson, Senate Committee on Women Affairs and Youth Development, Member, Senate Committees on Health, Education, Finance and Land, as well as Member of the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association (CPA) and Chairperson, Women and Child Right Committee of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS Parliament).

“You have not relented on this and I salute your courage and steadfastness. As you celebrate this milestone, my prayer is that almighty God will grant you longer life, good health and more wisdom to serve humanity and the country.”

The birthday “girl” was born Daisy Ukpomwan Ehanire on August 6, 1952 in Benin City.Daisy attended government secondary school in Benin City, Edo State, before studying at Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, where she graduated with a BA in Law in 1976.

In 1977, she was called to the Nigerian Bar. Daisy undertook NYSC as a State Counsel with the Ministry of Justice of Lagos State, and was a legal counsel to the Legal Aid Council of Nigeria. She worked as an Executive Assistant at the defunct Nigerian Acceptances Limited (NAL), a Merchant Bank, from 1977 to 1978. She was Company Secretary/Legal Adviser to the Nigerian Television Authority (NTA) from 1982 to 1992.

The philanthropist was elected Senator of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (2003-2007) representing Edo South from 2003 to 2007.As a senator, she served as the Chairman, Senate Committee on Women Affairs and Youth Development; Member, Senate Committees on Health, Education, Finance and Land Transport. She has also served as Chairman, Women and Child Right Committee of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS Parliament).

Daisy contested for second tenure for her senate office during the 2011 Nigeria general election but was unsuccessful.She is married to the former military general and minister of defence, Theophilus Yakubu Danjuma, who is the founder of the oil exploration company, South Atlantic Petroleum. Daisy Danjuma does her selfless and humanitarian works via the T.Y Danjuma Foundation.

FirstBank Branch, Head Office, Not Sealed

Our attention has been drawn to the news reports online with the conflicting claims that FirstBank branch or/head office has been sealed.

Please be informed that the referenced story is a misrepresentation of the facts and misleading. Neither our branch nor head office was sealed. On the 4th of August, 2022, there was an unlawful enforcement at the Bank’s Coomassie House Branch of a garnishee order issued by a Federal High Court sitting in Abuja which order the Bank is still challenging in court.

While the Bank has taken appropriate legal steps to deal with the situation, we wish to reassure our customers of unhindered banking services and unique customer experience in all our branches and through our numerous alternative channels.

Ex-IGP, Tafa Balogun Dies at 74

A former Inspector-General of Police, Mustapha Balogun, is dead.

He died at the Reddington Hospital in Lekki, Lagos State at about 8:30 pm yesterday after a brief illness, family sources said.

Force Public Relations Officer and Chief Superintendent of Police (CSP), Olumuyiwa Adejobi, however, said the police high command was yet to be informed of his demise by his family as is the practice as at the time of filling this report.

Born August 25, 1947, in Ila Orangun, Osun State, he was appointed the IGP in March 2002. Balogun died at 74. The cause of death is not yet known.

He was a member of cadet Assistant Superintendent of Police Course 3.

Having worked in various Police commands throughout the federation, and earning his promotions as at when due, Tafa, was at a time, the Principal Staff Officer to former Inspector-General of Police, Muhammadu Gambo, Deputy Commissioner of Police Edo State, the pioneer Commissioner of Police in Delta State.

He was also CP in Rivers and Abia States.

Balogun would be remembered for visiting the dreaded Okija Shrine in Anambra State, in a show of force, at a period of high-wire politics in the state.

It was widely believed that the shrine where politicians allegedly took oath of allegiance at the behest of their godfathers, had a reputation for neutralising recalcitrant adherents.

But in a dramatic twist that ended his career, the former police chief was arrested and manacled by the then Nuhu Ribadu-led Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) over corruption allegations.

“Can you imagine? Can you imagine?”, he had said while showing journalists his cuffed hands.

Towards the end of 2004, there were allegations of corruption on a massive scale, against him in which he was accused of pocketing public money and taking bribes from politicians and criminals. These led to his forced retirement in January 2005.

On 4 April 2005, Tafa Balogun was arraigned at the Federal High Court, Abuja on charges involving about N13 billion obtained through money laundering, theft and other sources. The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission under Nuhu Ribadu brought 70 charges against Tafa Balogun covering the period from 2002 to 2004.

Faced with overwhelming evidence, he made a plea bargain with the court in exchange for returning much of the property and money. He was sentenced to six months in jail and was released on 9 February 2006 after serving his sentence, part of it in Abuja National Hospital.

Since that humiliating end to his police career, he had largely withdrawn from the public eye, only making occasional appearances at social events.

Tafa, a fellow of the premier highest military institution in Nigeria, the National War College, later became the Assistant Inspector General of Police A.I.G Zone One, Kano, from where he was named the 21st IGP of Police on March 6, 2002.

He attended the University of Lagos, graduating in 1972 with a B.A. in Political Science. In May, 1973, he joined the Nigeria Police Force. While a police officer, he gained a law degree from the University of Ibadan.

FirstMonie Agents Transact Over Transacts Over N1billion, Reinforces leadership in Financial Inclusion

  • The Bank’s Firstmonie Agents play a critical role in promoting financial inclusion in the country  
  • The Bank currently has over 180,000 Firstmonie Agents spread across 772 Local Government Areas in Nigeria
  • Since 2020, FirstBank has economically empowered thousands of its Firstmonie Agents with over 100 billion naira credit facility

First Bank of Nigeria Limited, Nigeria’s premier and leading financial services provider has announced that its agent banking network – Firstmonie Agents – spread across the nook and cranny of the country has collectively processed transaction volume in excess of 1 billion, amounting to over 22 trillion naira. The Bank currently has over 180,000 Firstmonie Agents, spread across 772 of the country’s 774 Local Government Areas.

Firstmonie Agents have been integral to  bringing financial  services closer to the underbanked and unbanked segment of the society, providing convenient banking services that are easily accessible, thereby saving time and travel costs for individuals in the suburbs and remote environments with no access to financial services. 

Popularly referred to as the ‘Human ATM’, Firstmonie Agents are empowered to reduce the reliance on over-the-counter transactions while providing convenient personalized services. Amongst the services carried out by the Agents include; Account Opening, Cash Deposit, Airtime Purchase, Bills Payment, Withdrawals and Money Transfer. 

Through various empowerment and reward schemes implemented to put its Firstmonie Agents at an advantage to economically impact their immediate communities whilst importantly having their business sustained, the Bank’s Agent Banking scheme has remained a toast to Nigerians, irrespective of where they are in the country. Amongst these schemes is the Agent Credit – launched in 2020 – which has had the Bank provide credit facilities to the tune of 238 billion naira to its teeming Firstmonie Agents.

Expressing his appreciation to the Firstmonie Agents, Dr. Adesola Adeduntan, CEO, FirstBank said “since the relaunch of our Agent Banking scheme in 2018, our Firstmonie Agents have played a vital role in bridging the financial inclusion gap in the country, as many more people have been able to undertake various financial and business transactions in cost-effective ways, thereby saving a lot of time and money in travelling over long distances for basic banking services.“

“We are delighted by the giant strides of our Firstmonie Agents in promoting financial inclusion and commend them for their efforts in taking banking to the doorsteps of Nigerians – irrespective of where they are – in a very effective way”, he concluded.

 

Still On Sam Omatseye’s ‘Obituary’

By IKECHUKWU AMAECHI

WHEN a friend of mine called on Monday afternoon to ask if I had read Sam Omatseye’s ‘obituary’ in The Nation newspaper, my heart skipped a beat.

I have not seen The Nation newspaper’s Editorial Board chairman this year and not being one of my favourite columnists because of his penchant for puerile exuberance and indecency, I hardly read him. His solecism in the guise of intellectualism puts me off. Did I miss any news of an ill-health? I wondered.

But I was relieved when I was told he was hale and hearty. The ‘obituary’ was the title of his column this week. My friend urged me to read it. I did. And what I read was typical of Omatseye’s asinine, zany predilection. It was beneath contempt. Was I offended? Yes! But I also pitied him because it amounts to self-hatred for anyone to put his name to such beyond the pale piece all in the name of waging a proxy political battle. But I would have shrugged it off, having no appetite whatsoever to suffer fools gladly, except for the fact that he upped his impolitic ante on Tuesday with a tweet calling out the major target of his unprovoked vitriol on Monday, Mr. Peter Obi, presidential candidate of the Labour Party.

“Mr. Peter Obi, call your supporters to order. They are calling and issuing death threats. If anything happens to me, you will be held responsible!” Omatseye tweeted. What impudence! Apparently, he is beginning to take himself way too serious. Such exaggerated sense of self-worth fueled by insouciant hubris is a deadly brew.

I wasn’t going to respond initially despite Omatseye’s deliberate and unprovoked denigration of the entire Igbo race just to pander to the whims and caprices of his benefactor because in idolatrously fawning over his god, Asiwaju Bola Tinubu, he had also insulted venerable personages like the late Mama H.I.D Awolowo and Pa Ayo Adebanjo in the past. Just as he did with his ‘obituary’ article, in June 2011, Omatseye, to the revulsion of all, launched an unprovoked attack on the Awolowo family in an article titled, “Awo Family Without An Awo”.

He disparaged the entire Awolowo clan and dismissed them as nonentities who were too worthless to step into their patriarch’s big shoes, a lofty height he claimed Tinubu had clambered on, but he had the harshest words for Awolowo’s ‘jewel of inestimable value’. “I wrote once that this woman whom Awo once described as the jewel of inestimable value has lost value to his cause.

If he came back to life, he would have committed the extraordinary act of divorce after death. Even his newspaper, The Tribune, has so stumbled and fallen that it swims in Awo’s vomit,” Omatseye, an Itsekiri, wrote about the wife of a man who the Yorubas regard as next to Oduduwa in their leadership pantheon.

What crime did the Awolowos commit? None! They only had the audacity to choose their friends and refused to fawn over Omatseye’s god. Providing justification for his harebrained piece, Omatseye said: “The Awo son that many expected to take after the father was Olusegun, who unfortunately died in a car crash. We shall never know if he could have pulled it off. But the others have not shown much of the paterfamilias’ brio and depth.

In the past decade, under this republic, they have blended with the wrong crowd. Even H.I.D hobnobbed with Alao-Akala, who brought illiteracy to governance; with Oyinlola who turned the grace of office into a hell-hole of despots; with Daniel who could not arrest his quick fall into megalomania.” A distraught Mama Awolowo lamented thusly: “At 95, I have lived long enough to expect common civility from younger ones, assuming that they received and imbibed proper home training. Having just lost my daughter less than two months ago, I also expect that normal people would spare me the kind of vitriolic attack that was unleashed on my person and my family; particularly as such an attack was entirely unprovoked.”

But the old woman expected too much from her traducer. Obviously Omatseye had no home training and he is uncouth. Anyone who could address a 95-year-old woman as he did is not a normal person. Because he is harebrained and unhinged, on April 16, 2018, he meted out the same condescending treatment to the indefatigable Pa Adebanjo, an Awo protégé, in his piece, “Adebanjo: Not my progressive”, on the man’s 90th birthday, labelling him a “turncoat”.

Like Mama Awolowo, Pa Adebanjo’s crime according to Omatseye was that he “was part of the unblushing train of Goodluck Jonathan”, in the 2015 election campaigns, and both attacks were prompted by Tinubu, the self-acclaimed Awo-incarnate, in furtherance of his deleterious agenda of pulling down the house that Awolowo built and becoming the leader of the Yoruba.

Being in the crosshairs of Tinubu’s vaunting political ambition is the only excuse that Omatseye needs to assume the role of a vicious attack dog. The fact that he willingly lends himself to such inelegant exertions makes his situation pathetic. A man who, without any qualms, eviscerates nonagenarians as he did to Mama Awolowo, Pa Adebanjo and many others, just to ingratiate himself with another man is lost.

The tragedy of the Sam Omatseye malady is that at 61 years and a grandfather, he is no longer a spring chicken and should not be associated with this hideous rascality.

Such smarmy conduct is beneath contempt. Omatseye’s obsession with the candidacy of Peter Obi is a perfect study in historical revisionism that should worry every well-meaning Nigerian. Obi is only one out of the motley crowd of presidential candidates. So far, he has run a clean campaign based on issues.

So, why is Omatseye and his patrons so obsessed with his candidature? Yes, Obi is Igbo, just as Tinubu is Yoruba and Atiku is Fulani. Most other ethnic nationalities have also registered their names in this titanic battle. But Obi is neither running as an Igbo candidate nor is he gunning for the presidency of the South-East.

If anything, it is Tinubu that from the onset adorned his quest in ethnic garbs. He made it clear that it is the turn of the Yoruba and he is the only one the cap fits.

It is amazing that those who ridiculed Ndigbo only yesterday as people lacking in political sagacity and worth are today wetting their underthings just because an Igbo man is on the 2023 ballot. But the 2023 election is not a war between the Yoruba and Ndigbo. It is a battle for the soul of Nigeria. And Nigerians who are disenchanted with the status-quo understand what is at stake. It is this realisation that informed the principled stance of Yoruba leaders such as Pa Adebanjo who have thrown their considerable moral weight behind Obi’s aspiration and ultimatum rejection of Tinubu’s nauseating entitlement mentality.

This is the reason for Tinubu’s rage against Ndigbo and Omatseye’s acerbic piece. They want to draw the Igbos out by provoking a fight between the two ethnic nationalities. Ndigbo will not fall for that bait because what is at stake in 2023 is far bigger than Tinubu and Obi. It is about Nigeria and ‘Kept Men’ like Sam Omatseye (apologies to Uzor Maxim-Uzoatu) are too inconsequential in the prevailing circumstance.

Nigeria’s First Professor of Geography, Akin Mabogunje, Dies at 90

Akinlawon Ladipo Mabogunje, Nigeria’s first geography professor, has died.

He died in the early hours of Thursday, August 4. He was aged 90. 

Mabogunje, the first African president of the International Geographical Union, had served variously as member of the Western Nigerian Economic Advisory Council in 1967, member, Federal Public Service Review Commission, 1972, Chairman, Nigerian Council for Management Development, 1976 and Pro-Chancellor and Chairman of Council, Ogun State University.

He was a distinguished and much-admired academician and educator, one who had ably demonstrated in theory, in teaching, and in practice, academic, professional, and administrative prowess in diverse fields and at national and international levels. His multi-dimensional capabilities, his multidisciplinary competencies, established him as a polymath. 

Mabogunje wrote “Urbanization in Nigeria” in 1968, which explored urbanisation and state formation in the country.

In 1999, he became the first African to be elected as a Foreign Associate of the United States National Academy of Sciences.

Until his death at 90, Mabogunje was the Chairman of Ibadan School of Government and Public Policy and mentor to its founder, Tunji Olaopa.

The news of his passing was announced in a statement by the National President, Ibadan grammar school old students’s Association, Oladimeji Mako.

READ THE STATEMENT BELOW

Dear Mountaineers,

May I on behalf of the Registered Trustees, National Executive Committee and the Entire members of Ibadan Grammar School Old Students’ Association announce the home call of our Icon and Trustee, Professor Akinlawon Ladipo Mabogunje (1931- 2022)

Prof joined the Saint Trumphant this morning 4th of August 2022.

We send our condolences to the Family, the academic community and indeed Nigeria.

More details will be provided later.

Adieu

Oladimeji Mako
National President